what is melbourne's most famous food (3)

What Is Melbourne’s Most Famous Food?

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    Melbourne is often considered Australia's culinary capital, thanks to the city's openness to and incorporation of a wide variety of international cuisines.

    Melbourne may be well-known for its coffee house culture and progressive lifestyle. Still, the city is also home to authentic versions of classic Australian fare, such as meat pies, which are especially popular among sports fans who go to the city to watch live rugby and cricket. Check out some of the top restaurants in Melbourne.

    The Top Meals in Melbourne That You Simply Cannot Miss

    what is melbourne's most famous food

    Roasted Lamb

    Nothing says "Australian" quite like a Sunday roast. We've become a sheep-rearing nation since the early days of British colonisation, so lamb is readily available and inexpensive. The Aussie ideal is a leg on lamb, roasted over potatoes, then served with peas and sauce on a Sunday.

    Almost every bar and even some fine dining establishments offer Sunday roasts as a special.

    A Mediterranean influence was clear in the ingredients used in Melbourne's Haute lamb roasts, which frequently include citrus, olives, oregano, and tomatoes.

    Among the best Middle Eastern restaurants in the city is Rumi, where they offer theirs rubbed with spices plus topped in halloumi, feta, and kasseri cheeses. They also serve a now-iconic version without almonds & red pepper.

    The Banh Mi

    With the end of the Vietnam War, many Vietnamese immigrants flocked to Melbourne, bringing an abundance of fantastic Vietnamese bakeries.

    Since then, the banh mi sandwich, a baguette stuffed with pate, pork, mayonnaise, cucumber, pickled carrot, radish, and cilantro, has become a popular lunch option for Melburnians, especially in the heavily Vietnamese-populated areas like Footscray or Springvale, where you've been spoiled for choice.

    Yet, if you believe the advertisements, Bunn Bakery, To's Baker & Café, and Nhu Lan Bakery are the top choices. Both N. Lee Bakery & Trang Café and Cafe are well-known in the CBD for their excellent takes on the banh mi, while N. Park Bakery is revered for its grilled pork, and Trang for its crispy pork.

    Meat Pie

    On a trip to Melbourne during March and September? There is no true Melbourne Cricket Ground experience without scarfing a hot pork pie.

    Delicious with a generous dousing of tomato sauce, the traditional pie is a hand-held treat consisting of shortcrust pastry packed in diced minced meat with gravy.

    The ubiquitous Australian meat pies, such as the time-honoured Four's Twenty, are a direct ancestor of their British counterpart and can be purchased for just a few dollars at any of the city's many supermarkets.

    Nevertheless, the glory of pastry-encased meat is best appreciated in rural bakeries, which are essentially standalone establishments selling pies and sausage rolls.

    Two years in a row, the Baking Federation of Australia has named the pies at Country Cob Bakery in Kyneton (a 90-minute train ride from Melbourne) the best in the country.

    The Pie Shop serves up upscale takes on classics for city dwellers, such as a pork-based spag bol (Australian for spaghetti Bolognese) pie with cheese and meat-free broccoli, cheddar, and tomato salad.

    FAQs About Melbourne

    Melbourne is known for being one of the most liveable cities on earth. Often referred to as 'the Sporting Capital of the World', besides this it is also famous for its graffitied laneways, excellent coffee, cultural diversity and bayside location. This eclectic Australian city has something for everyone.

    With friendly people, a great lifestyle and endless business opportunities, you'll quickly fall in love with Melbourne. There are many reasons why Melbourne has been consistently rated one of the world's most liveable cities. That's why Conde Nast Traveler magazine ranked us as the world's friendliest city in 2014

    Melbourne is ranked the eighth safest city in the world behind Sydney, Copenhagen. Melbourne is one of the world's safest cities but has been beaten by another Australian capital.

    Of course, cool is inextricably linked to culture and arts. It's no surprise, therefore, that Melbourne is the centre of Australia's contemporary art scene and has been for nearly a full century. These days, Melbourne's artistic "cool" is much more visible in its city-wide street art scene.

    Melbourne has a highly diverse economy and population, leading to a huge variety of cuisines, attractions, and nightlife. Still, it also benefits from a warm climate and brilliant provision of public services. Melbourne is one of Australia's oldest cities and the original Australian gold rush town.

    Gozleme

    Unlike other major cities, Melbourne does not have a thriving street food scene. The enormous Greek souvlaki and the Turkish gozleme are notable outliers to this rule.

    Large squares are chewy; uncooked flatbread stuffed with spinach, ground beef, cheese, or a mix thereof, then grilled on a flat top so that the centre stays soft and the edges crisp.

    It's the perfect portable lunch since you can eat it with whatever dipping sauce you like. EveUnfortunately, though there is a sizeable Turkish community both in Melbourne, only the latter has gozleme available at train stations and in large food markets. Also, you may find kebabs rolled by handmade Turkish grandmas just at the local school fair, and hundreds of kebab shops open late.

    Crispy, Warm, and Jam-Filled

    Inspired by the German Berliner, this jam-filled doughnut is about the size of a tennis ball and served to steam hot from the fryer.

    Melburnians' winter survival strategy involves waiting in line for a paper bag of these yeast-risen delicacies outside a street kiosk or converted truck.

    Even in the summer heat, the line at the iconic American Doughnut Café van in Queen Victoria Market never seems to shorten (they use a unique blend of local raspberry and plum jam).

    The Magic

    what is melbourne's most famous food (2)

    Over 30 tonnes of coffee beans, or 3 million cups of coffee, arrive daily via boat at the Melbourne port.

    For Melburnians, coffee is as ingrained in the culture as live music or Australian rules football, and that just doesn't cut it.

    Though the classic latte remains the most popular coffee drink worldwide, a true Melbourne native knows to order a flat white consisting of two espresso shots and micro-famous milk. It has since taken over restaurants worldwide.

    A distinctively Melbournian innovation, the less-milky magic differs from barista to barista. The standard recipe calls for a double ristretto using three-quarters flat white milk.

    Like New York City and Chicago, Melbourne has its distinct pizza style. However, these pies were smaller and far less floppy than that in New York, also with thicker, firmer crusts.

    Melbourneites tend to pour on many more condiments than other cities. So, for instance, the capriccioso (inspired by an Italian pizza of the same name) has olives, chopped ham, plus mushrooms.

    Old-school pizza & pasta shops with walls covered in Polaroids with sports memorabilia serve capriccioso on Melbourne's historic Italian strip, Lygon Street in Carlton.

    While excellent Italian pizza has recently become available in Melbourne, the capriccios on Lygon Road best represent the unique history of Italian immigration to Australia.

    The Dim Sim

    Developed in Melbourne in the 1940s with Chinese-Australian restaurant William Chen Wing Young, this dim sim (or "dummy," locally) should not be confused with dim sum.

    Even as Cantonese dim sum mainstay siu mai is so popular Down Under, he decided to produce his version, although one that is significantly larger and has a thick flour wrapper, before deep-frying it to a golden crisp.

    After some time, he started making them inside a factory & selling them wholesale to convenience stores and the city's many takeaway restaurants, which serve up a wide variety of deep-fried fast food.

    The most well-known producer is South Melbourne Markets Dim Sims, a family-run business that's been around for 60 years.

    Theirs are spherical, steamed or fried, and stuffed with a blend of lettuce, chicken, pork, and lamb; they're delicious with a few dashes of soy and pepper sauce.

    Jaffle

    Almost every kitchen in Australia has a jaffle maker, a device similar to a panini press.

    You prepare jaffles by buttering both sides of two pieces of bread, filling them with a saucy filling (like baked peas or leftover Bolognese), and then sealing the sandwich in a heated jaffle machine so that you get four crisp, closed, clamshell-shaped wedges.

    A map veggie jaffle from Super Ling and the vegan butter chicken & Creme egg jaffles at Bad Frankie are two examples of restaurants leaning into nostalgia by serving new interpretations of this traditional after-school snack.

    Parma

    Chicken schnitzel smothered with ham, tomato-based Napoli sauces, with melted cheese is the ultimate Australian pub classic.

    Known as "party" or "party" in other parts of the country, "parma" is the preferred moniker in Melbourne, where it is typically served alongside fries and a salad.

    Like American chicken parmesan, it is likely an Italian immigrant variation of Italy's eggplant parmigiana. However, its precise beginnings are uncertain (the earliest reference of a chicken parma on the menu can be linked to the Pimlico Restaurant inside the Melbourne neighbourhood in Kew in 1980).

    Every bar in town, respectable or not, has a parma on the menu, and several even have parma nights.

    You can get a classic one at the Birmingham Hotel near Fitzroy or walk a few blocks to the Napier Hotel and get one with smoked kangaroo instead of ham.

    Gyros and Souvlaki

    Since Melbourne has the largest non-Greek Greek population anywhere in the world, thousands of bargoers flood onto the streets every night in pursuit of the town's premier drunk meal, souvlaki.

    Most souvlaki joints are mom-and-pop operations open till the wee hours of the morning. Skewered or rotisserie-roasted meats take centre stage on the menu.

    The most common ingredients include lamb, sauce, tomato, onion, cabbage, plus fries.

    Stalactites in the Central Business District and the Authentic Greek Souvlaki Bar in Fitzroy offer traditional solutions featuring feta.

    If you're in the mood for a souvlaki, you could always do what Ben Shewry of Attica suggests and visit Kalimera Souvlaki Artwork near Oakleigh.

    Toast with Avocado

    Breakfast toast topped with avocado has become a universal icon of the weekend.

    Sydney restaurateur Bill Granger introduced avocado toast to his eponymous cafe's menu in 1993. (Does slapping stuff onto bread qualify as an invention?)

    The rest, as they say, is history—or at least the breakfast you ate several times this week. "Avo and toast" and "smashed avo" are popular in Australia and New Zealand. The staple ingredients are mashed avocado on toast with salt, lemon juice, cracked pepper, and occasionally crumbled feta.

    Yet, most cafes put their spin on things by adding something extra, such as a runny 63-degree egg, halloumi, dukkah, or even tomato slices or tahini.

    Monk Bodhi Dharma demonstrates moderation by serving only feta, mint, chilli, and lemon at a restaurant in the St. Kilda beach area. Simultaneously, the Italian-themed Carlton restaurant Ima Project Cafe brings a taste of Japan with the use of nori paste & off it.

    A packet of Halal Snacks

    In 2016, an Australian Muslim lawmaker made waves worldwide by inviting a right-wing colleague to share a halal snack pack (HSP).

    Although the HSP did not accept the invitation, it symbolised Australia's commitment to multiculturalism.

    Chip (that is, fries) topped with halal kebabs, chile, garlicky, and barbeque sauce; sometimes cheese is served in a Styrofoam box, which is just as popular (if not more so) in Sydney.

    After a night out on the town, grabbing a quick kebab and wolfing it down without any ceremony is better.

    Expert move: heaping on as much tabbouleh, onions, falafel, and whatever else you can find at a kebab shop.

    Eggplant prepared in the Sichuan style.

    An energetic, youthful Chinese community that continues to develop and influence Melbourne's food can be found in the city's Chinatown, one of the oldest in the world and dates back to the 1850s gold rush.

    Hence, a hundred Chinese delicacies, such as xiao long buns, Peking duck, and abalone in oyster sauce, help characterise Melbourne cuisine.

    But the Sichuan fried eggplant is the one that keeps us up at night with hunger and creates chopping battles across the table.

    Lightly breaded & fried for a crisp surface, these eggplant spears are served in a Jenga-like tower and drizzled with a gooey, salty-spicy-sweet sauce that will have you fighting your grandma for more.

    Dainty Sichuan in South Melbourne is the place to go for the traditional, bring-the-whole-family-and-your-own-wine version.

    Visit Lee Ho Fook to taste the Chinese-Australian chef Victor Liong's polished and contemporary but equally happy take on the classic.

    Laksa

    Laksa, a type of noodle soup, may be found in various iterations across the Southeast Asian island states.

    The most popular kind in Australia is indeed the creamy type, which combines noodles, shellfish, and bean sprouts with a brilliant orange coconut broth flavoured with only a thick, aromatic mixture of galangal, fish sauce, and lemongrass.

    It's cheap, comforting, and easy on the wallet, making it ideal for college budgets, hangovers, heartaches, and chilly Melbourne evenings.

    Soups like laksa can be found in restaurants serving cuisines as diverse as Thai, Chinese, Malaysian, and Indonesian, attesting to the many ways Southeast Asia has converged in Melbourne.

    Since Melbourne is home to people from all across Asia, you can always find a great laksa to satisfy your noodle cravings.

    Abla's Famous Chicken with Rice

    Of the many Lebanese eateries in Melbourne, Abla's is a local favourite. Middle Eastern flavour was added to Australia's already well-known Mediterranean cuisine throughout the 1970s and 1980s when a flood of Lebanese immigration arrived.

    It was simple for Melburnians to switch from Italian to Greek to Lebanese cuisine. Abla Amad's much-loved handbook Abla's Lebanese Kitchen taught an entire generation of Australians how to prepare the olives, lemons, & tomatoes that are essential to these cuisines.

    The chicken and rice at her eponymous eatery is a fragrant pilaff topped with chopped chicken, minced lambs, walnuts, and fir nuts. Put a little homemade labneh on a spoon, and everything will be okay.

    Cruffin

    Ex-Formula One engineer and architect Kate Reid is responsible for what is arguably the best classic croissant in the world. She is also widely credited as the inventor of the cruffin, a Frankenstein pastry that rocked the world in 2013.

    Croissant batter is baked in a muffin tin, and then cream, jelly, and curd is baked within. For more information on this, you may check out Lune Croissanterie directly.

    Lines out all the door at the Fitzroy flagship (another location in the CBD) form for the seasonally-changing flavours, including yuzu, Black Forrest, and lemon cheesecake.

    Food at Shandong Mama: Fish Mackerel Dumplings

    Legendary dumplings that have become a Melbourne institution. Mackerel is the quintessential example of a high-end, yet prohibitively pricey, dumpling filling.

    This is not budget-friendly stuffing. Mother was up in Yan Thai, Shandong Province port, so she has a special connection to the ocean and a passion for preparing seafood.

    These dumplings provide a flavorful punch at the first bite.

    Fresh mackerel fillet was blended by hand with coriander, ginger, and chives to make a mousse-like filling for the Fish Dumplings, which were then encased in handcrafted, paper-thin dumpling skin.

    You can count on the consistency and flavour of this dumpling. A dainty dumpling.

    To be serious, the fish mackerel dumplings pictured above are among the greatest dumplings you'll ever eat.

    Luxury Mackerel (premium ingredient) dumplings have a mousse-like creaminess.

    dumplings

    Leonardo's Meat Lovers Pizza

    Stop by Leonardo's when you're out and about in Carlton and start craving pizza. The Meat Lover's pizza is a masterpiece, topped with pig and fennel sausage, salami, prosciutto, onions, syrup, and thyme, and smothered in a tomato and nduja cheese blend.

    The dough and crust are fantastic, the tomato and cheese flavour is spot on, there's a nice amount of spice, and the meat is high quality and slightly sweet. Pizza that's worth travelling across town for.

    Tagine of Lamb Shoulder from Morocco served in the Prince's Dining Hall.

    The Pr.ince Dining Room is a casual and stylish eatery in St. Kilda with a menu that draws inspiration from the Mediterranean.

    The highlight was a Moroccan tagine for two consisting of Flinders Islands lamb shoulder, plums, cumin, pilaff, and smoked yoghurt.

    The lamb is presented brilliantly, with the wait staff cutting it up right in front of you so that it may be shared between two people.

    The meal is served with several tasty sides and is not too substantial. Don't discount the savoury flavour of the prunes, pilaff, and kale, though.

    Conclusion

    Because of its welcoming attitude towards and embrace of a wide range of different cuisines, Melbourne is frequently referred to be Australia's gastronomic capital. In addition, it serves traditional Australian dishes like meat pies that are sure to please any sports fan. Roast lamb, banh mi, grilled pork, and meat pie are some of the city's most popular dishes. The banh mi sandwich is a favourite among Melburnians looking for something to eat for lunch. It consists of a baguette loaded with pate, pork, mayonnaise, cucumber, pickled carrot, radish, and cilantro. The best Vietnamese bakeries include Bunn Bakery, To's Baker & Café, and Nhu Lan Bakery.

    Meat pies like the Four's Twenty, a Melburnian speciality, may be obtained for a couple of dollars at any of the city's many supermarkets. Rural bakeries like Kyneton's Country Cob Bakery are where you can truly appreciate the beauty of meat enclosed in pastry. The Pie Shop is a restaurant in New York City that sells gourmet versions of comfort food, such as a pork-based spag bol (Australian for spaghetti Bolognese) pie with cheese and meat-free broccoli, cheddar, and tomato salad. Gozleme, a large flatbread, can be packed with spinach, ground meat, cheese, or a combination of these ingredients and then grilled on a flat top so that the centre remains soft and the outside crunchy. While Melbourne and Sydney are home to sizable Turkish communities, only Sydney's train stations and major food stores stock gozleme. This Is Where the Magic Happens Melbourne residents' winter survival plan involves standing in line for a paper bag of yeast-risen treats outside a street kiosk or converted truck, where over 30 tonnes of coffee beans arrive every day via boat at the port.

    The double ristretto pizza popular in Melbourne features three-quarters flat white milk, giving it a unique flavour. Carlton's Lygon Street is lined with retro pizzerias and pasta joints serving up capriccioso amid walls plastered in sports-themed Polaroids and vintage memorabilia. The Dim Sim is a speciality of the Chinese-Australian restaurant founded by William Chen Wing Young in 1940s Melbourne; it is comparable to the classic Cantonese dim sum dish siu mai. Dim Sims, located in South Melbourne Markets, has been in operation for the past 60 years and is still run by the same family. For a delicious jaffle, butter both sides of two slices of bread, fill one with your favourite filling and seal the other in a hot jaffle maker. Add some soy and pepper sauce, and they become excellent.

    In Melbourne, it is most commonly referred to as "Parma," and it is served with fries and a salad. Although its origins are murky, eggplant parmigiana is likely a derivative of the Italian dish of the same name brought over by Italian immigrants. There is a parma at every local watering hole, and many even host parma nights. In 1993, Bill Granger introduced avocado toast to the world in his eponymous cafe. Cafés typically spin things by adding special touches, such as a runny 63-degree egg, halloumi, dukkah, or even tomato slices or tzatziki.

    In 2016, an Australian Muslim politician caused a stir when he invited a conservative colleague to share a halal snack pack with them (HSP). The HSP, covered with chilli, garlicky, and barbeque sauce and piled high with halal kebabs, was meant to represent Australia's dedication to multiculturalism. Chinese specialities such as xiao long buns, Peking duck, and abalone in the oyster sauce may all be found in Melbourne's Chinatown. However, the most ordered meal in Melbourne is Sichuan fried eggplant, stacked like a Jenga game and covered in a sticky, salty, spicy, and sweet sauce. The noodles, shrimp, and bean sprouts in laksa are cooked in a bright orange coconut broth flavoured with only a thick, aromatic blend of galangal, fish sauce, and lemongrass. Being inexpensive, reassuring, and wallet-friendly, it's a great option for students on a tighter budget.

    It's common knowledge that Abla's Lebanese Cuisine is one of Melbourne's best restaurants. When waves of Lebanese immigrants arrived in Australia in the 1970s and 1980s, they brought Middle Eastern flavours that complemented the country's already popular Mediterranean cuisine. As a result, many Australians owe their knowledge of how to prepare olives, lemons, and tomatoes to Abla Amad's Abla's Lebanese Cuisine. At her namesake restaurant, the chicken and rice is a fragrant pilaff topped with chopped chicken, minced lambs, walnuts, and fir nuts. In addition, Kate Reid is credited for creating the cruffin, a Frankenstein pastry that took the world by storm in 2013.

    Dumplings filled with fish mackerel from Shandong Mama are delicious but unreasonably expensive. Located in the heart of St. Kilda, the Prince's Dining Hall is a chic and relaxed restaurant serving dishes with a Mediterranean influence. The show-stopper is a traditional Moroccan tagine made with Flinders Islands lamb shoulder, plums, cumin, pilaff, and smoked yoghurt for two. You can expect a few excellent sides and a light main course. The tomato and nduja cheese mixture atop Leonardo's Meat Lovers Pizza is complemented by pig and fennel sausage, salami, prosciutto, onions, syrup, and thyme that decorate this culinary masterpiece. Great dough and crust, spot-on tomato and cheese flavour, just the right amount of heat, and high-quality, subtly sweet meat.

    Content Summary

    • Because of its welcoming attitude towards and embrace of a wide range of different cuisines, Melbourne is frequently referred to be Australia's gastronomic capital.
    • Melbourne's progressive culture and coffee house scene may be its most recognisable features.
    • Sports enthusiasts who visit the city to see live rugby and cricket will also find accurate renditions of classic Australian fare, such as meat pies.
    • It would be best if you tried out some of Melbourne's finest eateries.
    • The Sunday roast is a staple of Australian culture.
    • During the early days of British colonisation, we have been a sheep-rearing nation, making lamb accessible and affordable.
    • On Sundays, the perfect meal in Australia is a leg of lamb roasted with potatoes and served with peas and sauce.
    • You can have a special Sunday roast at just about any restaurant on Sundays.
    • The Mediterranean influence on Melbourne's Haute lamb roasts may be tasted using lemon, olives, oregano, and tomatoes in these dishes.
    • Rumi, one of the city's premier Middle Eastern eateries, serves theirs rubbed with spices and topped with halloumi, feta, and kasseri cheeses.
    • Vietnamese immigrants flooded into Melbourne when the war ended, bringing an incredible array of Vietnamese bakeries.
    • Since then, the banh mi sandwich has become a staple in the lunchtime menus of Melburnians, particularly in neighbourhoods with a high Vietnamese population like Footscray and Springvale, where you may choose from a wide variety of options.
    • Meat pies, such as the classic Four's Twenty, may be obtained for a few dollars at any of the city's many supermarkets and are a direct ancestor of their British counterpart.
    • However, the grandeur of meat enveloped in pastry is best enjoyed at rural bakeries, which are essentially stand-alone enterprises offering pies and sausage rolls.
    • The little Turkish gozleme and the large Greek souvlaki are exceptions to this rule.
    • Melbourne has gozleme available at train stations and major food markets, but only because it has a larger Turkish population than Sydney.
    • Hundreds of kebab businesses operate late, and you can even find kebabs rolled by hand by Turkish grandmothers at the school fair.
    • Crusty, steaming and stuffed with preserves
    • This jam-filled doughnut, modelled by the German Berliner, comes out of the fryer steaming hot and is approximately the size of a tennis ball.
    • Melburnians' winter survival tactic is waiting in line for a paper bag of these yeast-risen treats at a street kiosk or converted truck.
    • Every day, ships bring enough coffee beans to make three million cups or over thirty tonnes.
    • The less-milky magic varies from barista to barista, but it's a uniquely Melbourne invention.
    • You should use three-quarters flat white milk in a double ristretto for a traditional ristretto.
    • In the same way that New York and Chicago each have their unique take on pizza, so does Melbourne.
    • Unlike their New York counterparts, these pies' crusts were thicker and harder, and their sizes were smaller.
    • Melbourne locals are notorious for using excessive amounts of condiments.
    • For example, the capriccioso (named after an Italian pizza of the same name) has olives, chopped ham, and mushrooms.
    • Lygon Street in Carlton is Melbourne's traditional Italian shopping district, and it features old-school pizzerias and pasta bars serving capriccioso amid walls covered in Polaroids of sports memorabilia.
    • Melbourne's great Italian pizza is a relatively new phenomenon, but the capriccios on Lygon Road are the best symbol of the Italian community in Australia.
    • Those of the Dim Sim
    • This dim sim (or "dummy," locally) was created in the 1940s at the Chinese-Australian restaurant William Chen Wing Young in Melbourne.
    • Given the widespread adoration Down Under for the Cantonese dim sum staple siu mai, he decided to make his version of the dish, which is considerably larger and has a thick flour wrapper, before deep-frying it to a golden crisp.
    • As time went on, he began producing them in a facility and selling them wholesale to local grocery stores and the city's many fast-food takeout joints.
    • South Melbourne Markets Dim Sims, run by the same family for 60 years, is the industry standard.
    • Steamed or fried, theirs are spherical and filled with a mixture of lettuce, chicken, pig, and lamb; they're great with a splash of soy and pepper sauce.
    • Every kitchen in Australia has a jaffle maker, similar to a panini press.
    • In other regions of Australia, this dish is known as a "party" or "party," but in Melbourne, where it is commonly served with fries and a salad, it is called a "parma."
    • Like the origins of chicken parmesan in the United States, eggplant parmigiana is probably an Americanized version of an Italian dish.
    • However, its origins remain murky (the earliest reference to a chicken parma on the menu can be linked to the Pimlico Restaurant inside the Melbourne neighbourhood in Kew in 1980).
    • You can get a parma at any pub in town, no matter how shady it may be, and some of them even offer parma evenings.
    • In Fitzroy, you'll find the Birmingham Hotel, where you can get a traditional one, or the Napier Hotel, where you can get one with smoked kangaroo instead of ham.
    • Souvlaki is the most popular intoxicated food in Melbourne. The city boasts the largest non-Greek Greek population in the world, so naturally, thousands of partygoers flood the streets at night in search of it.
    • In most places, you can have a delicious souvlaki meal till the wee hours of the morning at a mom-and-pop shop.
    • Meats on skewers or grilled on a rotisserie are the main attraction.
    • Lamb, sauce, tomato, onion, cabbage, and fries are typical toppings.
    • Ben Shewry of Attica recommends you stop by Kalimera Souvlaki Artwork in the Oakleigh area if you're craving souvlaki.
    • Avocado toast
    • Toast with avocado for breakfast has become a global symbol of the weekend.
    • Avo smashed on bread with salt, lemon juice, cracked pepper, and occasionally crumbled feta is a staple.
    • While this may be true, most cafes put their spin on things by including extras like a runny 63-degree egg, halloumi, dukkah, tomato slices, or tahini.
    • In 2016, an Australian Muslim politician caused a stir when he invited a conservative colleague to share a halal snack pack with them (HSP).
    • The invitation represented Australia's dedication to multiculturalism, even though the HSP did not accept it.
    • Chips (fries) with halal kebabs, chilli, garlicky, or barbeque sauce; sometimes cheese is provided in a Styrofoam box, which is just as popular (if not more so) in Sydney.
    • There's nothing better than coming home from a night on the town and scarfing down a kebab without any fanfare.
    • When ordering from a kebab establishment, an expert manoeuvre is to pile on as much tabbouleh, onions, falafel, and other toppings as possible.
    • Grilled eggplant made in the spicy Sichuan fashion.
    • Chinatown in Melbourne is one of the oldest in the world, dating back to the gold rush of the 1850s, and is home to a vibrant, young Chinese community that continues to flourish and influence Melbourne's gastronomy.
    • The cuisine of Melbourne is heavily influenced by a hundred different Chinese dishes, such as xiao long bao, Peking duck, and abalone in oyster sauce.
    • But the Sichuan fried eggplant gives us nightmares and starts knife fights at the dinner table.
    • These eggplant spears are lightly breaded and fried for a crisp surface, and they are served in a tower, Jenga-style, with a sticky, salty, spicy, sweet sauce that will have you fighting your grandma for more.
    • If you want to go old school and bring the whole family with a bottle of wine, head to Dainty Sichuan in South Melbourne.
    • The creamiest version features noodles, shrimp, and bean sprouts in a rich orange coconut broth flavoured with just a rich, aromatic blend of galangal, fish sauce, and lemongrass, indeed, the most popular variant in Australia.
    • Abla's is a popular choice among Melbourne's many Lebanese restaurants.
    • When waves of Lebanese immigrants arrived in Australia in the 1970s and 1980s, they brought Middle Eastern flavours that complemented the country's already popular Mediterranean cuisine.
    • Locals of Melbourne had little trouble transitioning from Italian to Greek to Lebanese fare.
    • A generation of Australians owes their knowledge of how to make the olives, lemons, and tomatoes fundamental to these cuisines to Abla Amad's much-loved cookbook Abla's Lebanese Kitchen.
    • At her namesake restaurant, the chicken and rice is a fragrant pilaff topped with chopped chicken, minced lambs, walnuts, and fir nuts.
    • A spoonful of homemade labneh can make anything better.
    • Kate Reid, a former Formula One engineer and now a renowned architect, is responsible for what is widely considered the best traditional croissant in the world.
    • Also, she is widely recognised as the brains of the cruffin, the Frankenstein-inspired pastry that took the world by storm in 2013.
    • Using a muffin tray, one can bake croissant dough with cream, jam, and curd fillings.
    • You can contact Lune Croissanterie for further details on this matter.
    • The seasonal flavours, such as yuzu, Black Forest, and lemon cheesecake, draw long lines at the Fitzroy flagship (another site in the CBD).
    • These legendary dumplings are a Melbourne staple.
    • The fish called mackerel is often used as a stuffing for expensive dumplings.
    • It's not cheap filling.
    • Mom was born in a port town on the coast of Shandong Province called Yan Chai; therefore, she has always had a deep love for and expertise in cooking seafood.
    • The first taste of these dumplings will hit you with a burst of flavour.
    • The stuffing for the Fish Dumplings was made by hand by blending fresh mackerel fillet with coriander, ginger, and chives to create a mousse-like mixture, which was then wrapped in handmade, paper-thin dumpling skin.
    • This dumpling has a dependable texture and flavour.
    • Something delicate like a dumpling.
    • Indeed, the fish mackerel dumplings depicted above are among the best dumplings you'll ever taste.
    • Dumplings made with excellent ingredients, such as mackerel, are as smooth and creamy as mousse.
    • If you crave pizza while shopping or strolling through Carlton, head to Leonardo's.
    • The Meat Lover's pizza is a work of art, piled high with nduja cheese and drowned in tomato sauce, fennel and pig sausage, salami, prosciutto, onions, syrup, and thyme.
    • Great dough and crust, spot-on tomato and cheese flavour, just the right amount of heat, and high-quality, subtly sweet meat.
    • Pizza is so good that people will drive across town to get it.
    • Moroccan lamb shoulder tagine was on the menu at the Prince's Banquet.
    • St. Kilda's Pr.ince Dining Room is a chic and laid-back restaurant serving dishes with a Mediterranean flavour profile.
    • The show stopper was the Flinders Islands lamb shoulder tagine with plums, cumin, pilaff, and smoked yoghurt.
    • The wait staff expertly presents the lamb by slicing it in front of your eyes so it can be easily split between two individuals.
    • You can expect a few excellent sides and a light main course.
    • Despite this, the prunes, pilaff, and kale all have a savoury taste that shouldn't be overlooked.
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